TECHNICAL INFORMATION AND ABBREVIATIONS
Tagging
The first two letters of the tagging code refer to the type of tagging; GT for "General Tagging" and WT for "Winnipeg Tagging". The number directly following the letters refers to the number of tagging bars, and the number following the dash represents the width, rounded up to the nearest millimetre. When collecting single stamps with the tagging stripes split by the perforations, it is impossible to measure the width accurately. When more than one width exists for a stamp, the actual spacing between the tagging bars will be listed in the the Notes section of each Checklist.
Type Width Notes
GT1-B 2mm Bottom bar caused by "shift-up" of tagging on 1st Parliament vending booklet.
GT1-L 2mm Left bar caused by "shift-over" of tagging on 1st Parliament vending booklet.
GT1-R 2mm Right bar caused by "shift-over" of tagging on 1st Parliament vending booklet.
GT2-3 3 to 3.5mm 3mm on some Landscapes, 3.5mm on various other stamps.
GT2-4 4mm Most common width. Width ignored on some checklists, when only one type exists.
GT2-2 2mm Used on 1st Class rate stamp in Parliament vending booklet (34c).
GT2-3 3mm Used on 1st Class rate stamp in Parliament vending booklet (34c, 36c, 37c, 38c)
GT4-4 4mm Tagged on all four sides.
GT4-5 5mm Most common width. Width ignored on some checklists, when only one type exists.
GT3-4 4mm Three vertical bars
GT3-5 5mm Three vertical bars
Paper Identification
A-C: Abitibi-Price had long been the sole supplier of paper for Canadian postage stamps, but in 1984 they ceased production. The coated version of Abitibi-Price paper has a glossy white surface on the front. The reverse is smooth and white. This paper was normally used for lithographed or photogravure stamps, but was not always the case.
A-U: The uncoated version of Abitibi-Price paper has a light creamish surface on the front. The reverse usually shows an embossing effect of the design through the stamp. Mint examples of the two 'A' stamps, MP-01a and MP-01b are good examples side by side to depict the differences between A-C and A-U paper. Uncoated paper was used for engraved stamps.
CL: Clarke Papers Ltd produced paper for engraved and lithographed stamps in 1984 only. However, both versions of this paper are indistinguishable to the naked eye, when compared with the Abitibi-Price versions. For this reason, separate listings are not given for stamps printed on both Clarke and Abitibi-Price paper. Both companies, however, are listed in the "paper" column.
C: Coated Papers Ltd began to supply paper for Canadian stamps in 1988, and continues to do so. It is recognized by its opaque qualities and smooth green tinted gum.
F: Fasson of Canada has produced paper for self adhesive stamps only.
H: Harrison of England has supplied paper since 1983. It is similar to Coated Paper, having greenish gum, but the gum is spotty rather than smooth. The paper is also more translucent, the design showing through the reverse.
J: JAC of Canada has produced paper for self adhesive stamps only.
P: Peterborough Paper (produced in Canada) first appeared in 1989. Its translucency is similar to that of Harrison, but the gum is smooth and not nearly as green in color.
R: Rolland Paper of Canada was used on Canadian definitive stamps between 1986 and 1988. Its characteristics are virtually indistinguishable from those of Abitibi-Price and Clarke.
S: Slater Paper debuted in 1988 and is still used. It is quite opaque, and the smooth gum is a distinct cream color.
V: Avery Dennison used their own self-adhesive paper for the ATM stamps
(HR) Horizontal ribbed paper, which can be distinguished with the naked eye. When existing, this suffix will follow the paper type.
(VR) As above, but vertical ribbed.
Printers
AP: Ashton Potter Ltd (Canada)
BABN: British American Banknote Company (Canada)
CBN: Canadian Bank Note Company (Canada)
LM: Leigh-Mardon Pty (Australia)
Printing Format
B4: Booklet panes of 4 A number in brackets refers to the actual quantity of the specified stamp in the booklet when other values also appear. As an example, B5(2) would mean that 2 of the total of 5 stamps are of the listed value. Labels are not included in the count.
B5: Booklet panes of 5
B10: Booklet panes of 10
B20: Booklet panes of 20
B25: Booklet panes of 25
B50: Booklet panes of 50
S50: Sheets of 50
S100: Sheets of 100
R100: Rolls (Coils) of 100


Questions? Comments? Send mail to briancannon@shaw.ca

Checklist

Back to BRC Home Page